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[a] = summary lessons
[b] = exegetical analysis
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What is a Mini-Series?
A Mini-Series is a small subset of lessons from a major series which covers a particular subject or book. The class numbers will be in reference to the major series rather than the mini-series.

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Galatians 5:16-23 teaches that at any moment we are either walking by the Holy Spirit or according to the sin nature. Walking by the Spirit, enjoying fellowship with God, walking in the light are virtually synonymous. During these times, the Holy Spirit is working in us to illuminate our minds to the truth of Scripture and to challenge us to apply what we learn. But when we sin, we begin to live based on the sin nature. Our works do not count for eternity. The only way to recover is to confess (admit, acknowledge) our sin to God the Father and we are instantly forgiven, cleansed, and recover our spiritual walk (1 John 1:9). Please make sure you are walking by the Spirit before you begin your Bible study, so it will be spiritually profitable.

Messages with tag - Dispensationalism

Sun, Jun 09, 2019
Passage: Ephesians 1:10
Series: Ephesians (2018)
Duration: 51 mins 26 secs
Imagine a world with no evil. Listen to this lesson to learn about the dispensation of the fullness of times when Jesus Christ will end all demonic and Satanic activity. See the ultimate goal of God in human history. Find out how we are to honor the glory of God in our lives. See that God’s purpose for believers is to be prepared to rule and reign with Christ in the coming kingdom.
Sun, Jun 02, 2019
Passage: Ephesians 1:9-10
Series: Ephesians (2018)
Duration: 59 mins 21 secs
What is the biblical meaning of dispensations? Listen to this lesson to learn the characteristics of each dispensation and three essential elements, including the importance of literal interpretation. Hear the distinct responsibilities of man and the promises and blessings from God for each. See that whatever we do, we should do for the glory of God to show His majesty, power, authority, and His unfailing love for us.
Wed, Mar 12, 2014
Series: 2014 Chafer Theological Seminary Bible Conference
Duration: 1 hr 18 mins 14 secs

Epistemology is the study of knowledge. It attempts to answer questions regarding the origin of human knowledge, and considers especially how we can know with certainty. Epistemological answers are basic and necessary building blocks of any philosophy, worldview, or belief system. In fact, of the four major components of philosophy and worldview (epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, and socio-­‐political thought), none can be adequately addressed until we answer the question of how we can know. Regarding metaphysics, for example, we can’t make legitimate assertions about the character of God or the existence of the human soul until we first address how such assertions can be verified or falsified. Further, unless we have a means for validating ethical prescriptions as either worthy or unworthy, we have no warrant for choosing one prescription over another – especially when we encounter apparently competing or conflicting goods. And if we have no mechanism for authentication, then how can we even arrive at a definition of what is good in the first place? Finally, in socio-­‐political thought, on what basis can we choose one system of government over another, or how can we determine whether a law is commendable? Without correct epistemological answers, there is no basis for our understanding or choosing one thing over another. In short, epistemology is really about authority, verifiability, truth, and certainty.

Imagine a person – we’ll call him Bob. Bob has just received the gift of consciousness. For the first time in Bob’s existence he is aware. Bob examines his surroundings and he finds himself standing in rolling sun-­‐drenched fields of dandelions under a beautifully clear mid-­‐day sky. Of course, Bob has no knowledge of what anything around him is or what any of it means, because this is the first time he has ever encountered any of these things. Bob begins to ponder. “Here I am, I suppose, now what?” Bob has to figure out how to answer that question before he takes his first step, lest he make the wrong assumptions and step in the wrong direction. He begins a quest to decipher the right understanding of who and what he is, and how he must proceed, but he isn’t certain of whether or not he has the right tools for the task. In fact, he isn’t certain of anything.

Wed, Mar 12, 2014
Series: 2014 Chafer Theological Seminary Bible Conference
Duration: 1 hr 21 mins 51 secs

Theonomy and Progressive Dispensationalism

Currently, it seems only those who see any religious activity in the public square as evidence of an impending theocracy would link any form of dispensationalism with reconstructionism. Douthat observes,

When the evidence for Rusdoonian infiltration of the Religious Right grows thin for even the most diligent decoder, the subject is usually changed to the Rapture, another supposed pillar of the emerging theocratic edifice. Premillennarian dispensationalism’s emphasis on the imminent collapse of all institutions, foreign and domestic, would seem an odd fit with Reconstructionism’s idea of hastening Christ’s coming by building his (political) kingdom on Earth. But every 1950s conspiracist knew that when Communists seemed to differ—Tito and Stalin, Stalin and Mao—it only concealed a deeper concord. Similarly, everyone on the Christian Right is understood to be on the same side, no matter their superficial disagreements.

While it is certainly true that “everyone…is on the same side” and that some disagreements between dispensationalists and reconstructionists are “superficial,” it must also be stressed that there are vast differences between the two, admittedly Christian and fundamental, camps. Yet recent movements in dispensationalism have made the association of these two groups less alarmist than it first appears. The fundamental shift in underlying assumptions that took place in the formation of progressive dispensationalism has now made such a linkage, not only possible, but logically necessary. Indeed, an examination of the changing relationship between theonomy and progressive dispensationalism is prudent for several reasons.

Tue, Mar 11, 2014
Series: 2014 Chafer Theological Seminary Bible Conference
Duration: 55 mins 41 secs
Arno C. Gaebelein was a leading fundamental, dispensational Bible teacher in the early half of the twentieth century. He served as one of the associate editors of the Scofield Reference Bible and left us thousands of pages of material in his writings. The theological content of these many writings emphasized three things: inspiration of the Bible, the centrality of Christ at a personal level, and eschatological issues. It is fairly easy to determine a precise statement of the central interpretive motif or integrating idea in Gaebelein’s thought. Bible inspiration can be ruled out simply because it does not integrate the content of Gaebelein’s theology although it does provide a hermeneutical basis. The centrality of Christ is clearly stated. However, the sheer weight of discussion of eschatology, with its various focuses, speaks as forcefully as many direct statements. Nonetheless, it is possible to merge the theological statements about the centrality of Christ with eschatology to produce one statement clarifying the integrating theme of Gaebelein’s theology. This can be done through the concept of prophetic hope which finds its fulfillment in the Second Coming of Christ. Thus, the central interpretive motif of Gaebelein’s theological formulations can be stated as prophetic hope centered in the personal Second Coming of Jesus Christ. That this theme truly integrates Gaebelein’s theological system will be seen by an examination of the individual and multiple expressions of prophetic hope which he outlined. However, it may be possible to see in these expressions, taken as a whole, the idea of a multi-faceted program of creation and redemption centered in Christ and leading to the glory of God. That is, unity from diversity can be seen in the light of this doxological purpose to biblical history as the greatness of our sovereign God is displayed.
Tue, Mar 11, 2014
Series: 2014 Chafer Theological Seminary Bible Conference
Duration: 58 mins 56 secs
Mike Stallard - The Life and Contribution of Arno C. Gaebelein presented at 2014 Chafer Theological Seminary Pastors' Conference
Mon, Mar 10, 2014
Passage: Psalm 8
Series: 2014 Chafer Theological Seminary Bible Conference
Duration: 1 hr 38 mins 14 secs
A narrative biblical theology necessarily features the glory of God. From the outset of Israel’s history, without any direct appearance of God (Deut. 5:4, 5; Exod. 33:18-23), his glory proceeded from him to appear in various expressions (Heb. 1:1). As an example, Moses stood in the presence of God’s glory when he saw the burning bush and spoke with God (Exod. 3:1-19). At the end, God’s glory most vividly and dramatically appeared in the First Advent (Heb. 1:2) and will appear in the Second Advent of the Son of God. Ryrie identified the revelation as a sine qua non of Dispensationalism yet called it “a rather technical matter.” This is the case because all biblical theologies feature God and his glory. But Ryrie’s viewpoint more specifically related to “the ultimate purpose of God” in biblical history. “The Bible itself clearly teaches that salvation, important and wonderful as it is, is not an end in itself, but is rather a means to the end of glorifying God (Eph. 1:6, 12, 14).” John F. Walvoord shared the same conviction: “The larger purpose of God is the manifestation of His own glory. To this end, each dispensation, each successive revelation of God’s plan for the ages, His dealing with the non-elect as well as the elect . . . combine to manifest divine glory.” Thus Dispensationalism is a narrative biblical theology in which God determines to ultimately reveal his glory for the good of those he chooses, for those who love him. Thus the title we’ve chosen for this overall narrative theology is “Drawn by God’s Glory.”
Tue, Oct 01, 2013
Passage: Acts 19:11-18
Series: Acts (2010)
Duration: 1 hr 8 mins 53 secs
A man with a demonic spirit inside him leaps on seven sons and in a smack-down brawl leaves them battered and naked. No, this isn't the adrenaline-charged plot of an action movie. It's a true incident in the book of Acts. Discover the Greek words for demon possession and different categories of demons. See how Paul, through the power of God, was healing sicknesses and casting out demons, making the jealous exorcists in Ephesus try to copy him. Find out how demon possession was active during the two offers of the Kingdom of God to the Jews during the first century.
Thu, Feb 02, 2012
Passage: Romans 5:1-2 & Genesis 32:26-29
Series: Romans (2010)
Duration: 1 hr 8 mins 20 secs
Also includes Galatians 3:6ff and Galatians 6:16